FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is different about the newest products?
Why is a steady action camera important?
How do the STUNTMAN products keep the camera steady?
How are STUNTMAN mounts different from a helmet mount?
The 360 and Pack Mount put the camera are off to the side. Is a centered point of view better?
Can I use your products underwater? What about salt water?
How does the free return shipping for US orders work?
What’s the best place to wear my action camera?
Do you have any tips and tricks for using your products?


What is different about the newest products?

New for 2017, the STUNTMAN 360, Chest Harness, Shoulder Harness, and new Pack Mount have base plates made from a new shock-absorbing polyurethane material. It's a semi-rigid polymer that is softer and more flexible than the thermoplastic used in our previous products. It also allows us to make products with variable thickness so our new base plates are more comfortable, yet they hold the camera just as steady. The 360, Shoulder Harness, and Pack Mount now feature our Ball Joint Adapters that make it easy to adjust camera angle exactly where you want it while you're wearing your camera. Finally, all of our products come with a complete set of adapters to allow you to mount just about any camera or accessory on the market.


Why is a steady action camera important?

Shaky cameras produce blurry video that lacks contrast and detail. Filming in low light makes it worse, so a steady action camera is super important if you're not filming in direct sunlight.

If you're filming fast or rough action and the camera is tilting or flopping around you end up with confusing video. The audience can't keep track of what's happening because the camera is never pointing in the same direction long enough. Often the best moments will be when the action is intense, so a steady mount is key.


How do the STUNTMAN products keep the camera steady?

Our elastic is wider, stronger, and softer. Our base plate material is a shock-absorbing semi-rigid polyurethane. Our anatomical base plate designs provide a more stable foundation to mount your action camera. 

STUNTMAN 360 and the Shoulder Harness sit over firm parts of your body – your shoulder blade, your rib cage, and your hip provide a firm foundation for your action camera. The base plates are curved to grab your body instead of sitting flat against it. The base plates are made from a shock-absorbing semi-rigid polyurethane material which helps reduce camera vibration. All the straps are 1.5 inch wide double strength elastic that is stronger than you will find on competitive products.

The STUNTMAN Chest Harness has a large 5 inch wide by 7 inch tall base plate. It's a lot more stable than the smaller base plates used on most chest mounts. Just like the 360, it's made from a shock-absorbing semi-rigid polyurethane material which helps reduce camera vibration. All the straps - most importantly the shoulder straps - are 1.5 inch wide double strength elastic.

Our STUNTMAN Pack Mount is made from the same shock-absorbing polyurethane. The base plate measures 7 inches long and 2.5 inches wide. It attaches to your shoulder strap securely in two places with no-slip straps. It's super convenient, but because it uses the shoulder straps of your pack, the stability depends on how heavy your pack is, how tight you wear the straps, and how thick the straps are. For best results wear pack mount in front of your shoulder where your straps are the tightest, and keep a little weight in your pack.


How are STUNTMAN mounts different from a helmet mount?

Helmet mounts are convenient and simple. Often they just don't give you video that captures the experience. Why?

The height of a helmet-mounted camera makes objects look smaller, and speeds look slower than they really are. You, your gear (skis, board, bike or whatever) and the objects around you all look small and far away from the camera. The wide angle lenses in action cameras magnify this effect.

Helmet-mounted cameras point where you’re looking. If you turn your head a lot while filming, it can make videos hard to watch.

With a helmet-mounted camera it’s hard to find an angle that puts you, your gear, and the horizon in the shot at the same time. You want the camera level so the audience can see where you’re going. But when you aim it at the horizon, you get cut out of the shot. You can point the camera down you get more of you in the frame, but you end up with a video of the ground in front of you.


The 360, Shoulder Harness, and Pack Mount put the camera off to the side. Is a centered point of view better?

It's all about preference, but we think mounting your camera dead-center doesn’t always make for the most interesting shots. Think of the Rule of Thirds in photography and film – the most appealing shots don’t have the subject centered in the frame. For a lot of activities you’re not squared up to the direction you’re moving. With your camera off to the side a bit, you can work with your body position to make the shot more immersive. Also, you get to see your bike, board, skis, or other gear from the side.

If you do want a centered perspective you can wear the STUNTMAN in the chest or hip position and mount the camera right at the front corner. That gives you a position just barely off of your midline.

And of course the STUNTMAN Chest Harness gives you that perfectly centered shot.


Can I use your products underwater? What about salt water?

Yes all of our products are fine for use underwater in fresh or salt water. Our fasteners are corrosion-resistant stainless steel. As with any equipment, it’s best to rinse in fresh water after using in salt water.


How does the free return shipping for US orders work?

We want you to be stoked about your STUNTMAN product. If you bought from our online store and you’re not totally satisfied, let us know within 30 days of when you received your order. If you're a US customer we’ll mail you a postage-prepaid return envelope. Give it to your postal carrier or drop it in the package bin at your nearest post office. We'll refund your purchase price as soon as we get your return.


What’s the best place to wear my action camera?

One of the cool things about our products is you get multiple places to mount your camera. And you can point the camera almost any direction. Even our Pack Mount allows you to mount the camera low by your ribs or high on your shoulder, on your left or right. We recommend experimenting until you find the one or two best shots for your activity. Editing cuts from different angles will keep your audience interested. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Shoulder

What’s great about it:

The camera sits at about eye-level so it really gives that point-of-view feeling to your videos (but it won’t move when you turn your head like a helmet cam). It's up high so you get the best view of your surroundings. And it's less likely that something will block the shot.

Some things to think about:

Since your camera is up high, you get some of the same drawbacks that you get with a helmet mount – objects look smaller, and speeds look slower. It’s better than having the camera on top of your helmet, but it’s not as good as the chest or hip.

If you mount the camera back on your shoulder you’ll get the side of your head. This could be good or bad depending on what you’re going for. If you don't want your head in the shot, move the camera forward so it sits in front of your shoulder.

Hip

What’s great about it:

In a lot of sports your “attack position” is a crouch with your knees bent, your hips back, and your upper body leaning forward. Wearing your camera on your hip lets you get a lot of your body, arms and legs in the shot. It's a good choice for filming technique.

A lower camera position shows the size of objects and the speed you’re going more accurately. The audience can see objects get big fast as they move towards the lens. When the environment rushes past the lens it feels very immersive.

Pointing a hip camera backwards really shows off your speed as you watch objects recede into the distance.

Some things to think about:

If your activity has a lot of leg motion (pedaling a bicycle for example) your thigh may hit the camera, block the shot, or rock the camera from side to side more than a chest or shoulder mounted camera.

It's too far from eye-level to have that 'POV' feel.

Chest

What’s great about it:

The chest is the sweet spot between the hip and the shoulder. The audience gets a good feeling of speed and scale while it still feels kind of like a point-of-view shot.

You can get very close to a dead-center camera position by mounting your adapter at the front corner of the STUNTMAN 360, or use the Chest Harness.

It's least affected by your movement. Your shoulders and hips might move a lot, but a chest mount stays pretty steady no matter what.

Some things to think about:

Chest mounted cameras can get in the way. If your activity has something up against your chest you won’t be able to run the camera in front. Some activities will have you blocking the shot with your arms a lot. Centered isn't always the most interesting angle.

Do you have any tips and tricks for using your products?

STUNTMAN 360

When you're setting up your 360 for the first time, start with the straps loose. After you learn how to wear it, adjust the straps until you get a good balance of stability and comfort. The straps are a very strong elastic so for most activities you don't need the straps super tight.

STUNTMAN lets you mount your camera in some places that aren't easy to reach. Get into the stance you'll be in when filming and have a friend help you set the angle. You can also use a mirror or use a bluetooth app on your phone.

Pack Mount

For stability, keep your pack straps tight. Camera stability depends on the construction of your shoulder straps, how much weight you have in the pack, and how tight you wear the straps. For best results wear it where your straps pull across the front of your shoulders. If your pack has a chest strap leave it looser so the shoulder straps sit wider. The tension in your straps is highest there.

All Products

Keep the camera positioned as tight to your body as possible. The more it sticks out, the less stable it will be.

Often it's best to mount the camera upside-down so it "hangs" from the mount. You can easily flip the image with camera settings, or using video editing software. It’s easier to get the camera level when you lean forward and it's more stable because gravity works for you instead of against you.